Book Review: "Why Romney Lost The 2012 Election"


The new eBook Why Romney Lost The 2012 Electionhighlights the miscalculations, gaffes and tactical errors committed by Mitt Romney and his campaign advisers during the course of the 2012 Presidential campaign. Romney's defeat seemed to surprise many republicans and Mitt Romney himself. It should not have been a surprise based on his troubled campaign effort. The book, written by Mark Allen, takes a sobering look at the many issues which plagued the former Massachusetts Governor in the months leading up to November 6, 2012.
The book is logically broken into sections which include:
  1. Romney's falsehoods
  2. Refusal to release his tax returns
  3. His position against the auto bailout
  4. "Corporations are People" comments
  5. Flip-flops
  6. Bizarre comments and behavior
  7. 47% comments (undercover video)
  8. Unwillingness to distance himself from right-wing extremists
  9. Unpreparedness to be Commander-In-Chief
  10. Selection of Paul Ryan as VP running mate
The author does a good job of gathering the evidence and presenting it in an interesting manner. In addition, the facts are meticulously cited using credible news sources. As I read the book it was difficult not to be amazed by the amount of self-inflicted damage Romney did to himself at different stages of the campaign. I remembered some of his major flip-flops, but I was unaware of several others. It also seemed that Romney and his campaign made a calculated decision to intentionally stray from the truth on multiple occasions. That may have slipped by the base of the party, but it almost assuredly alienated some moderate and independent voters. One glaring example presented in the book was the Jeep ad which ran in Ohio during the final days of the campaign. Romney asserted that U.S. jobs would be moving to China. It was not true. It was discredited my multiple media outlets as being false and it brought strong rebukes from Chrysler and GM. Romney refused to pull the ads and some analysts believe the decision backfired badly in Ohio.